Desang Diabetes Magazine, Dr Rose Stewart diabetes psychologist, wearing type 1 diabetes technology

25

LIVING

affirmative change in diabetes care,

but change can bring on challenges.

I hear positive a lot of feedback from

people who are using tech, though

it's often not always as easy as they

thought it would be. Some find

it harder than others, but it's not

always clear who will and who won't

get on with it.

I think about the three ways that

it can affect someone. The first is

psychological - what happens in our

head. The second is biological - what

happens in our bodies. The third is

sociological - how we interact with

those around us. When it comes to

the development of technology and

health, the focus is on the biological

and the other aspects tend to

get neglected

One question is, does this person

really need the technology, and

how will it be of benefit? So, myself

and others, have set out what we

see as the benefits of technology

to someone biologically. These

include: more data, continuous

monitoring, advanced warnings,

in-depth analysis, and the ability

for micromanagement. However,

the downsides can be risk of failure

- the kit could fail, and technical

inaccessibility (not offered by local

clinic, person does not qualify).

Then there are the psychological

benefits: tech can improve sleep,

increase self-efficacy, and reduce

diabetes distress. However, the

failings can include: the data

becoming overwhelming, increased

visibility of the diabetes, increased

anxiety, alarm fatigue, and what

we can call the 'myth of control',

which is to say that people think

they will go on an insulin pump, or

flash monitoring, or CGM and it will

'cure' their diabetes, but it does not,

though it can change how to deal

with it.

Lastly, in terms of the sociological

aspects of using diabetes kit, there

are also pros and cons. The benefits

include improved sleep (also for

partners, parents, carers) due to a

reduction in nighttime hypos - and

the fear of them. Other benefits

can include: reduced anxiety,

and the opportunity for a visible

communicator about the state of

their diabetes - seeing their control

on a screen, perhaps even on their

phone or watch. However, the

failings can be: relationship intrusion,

follower conflict, data ownership,

and the downsides of having visible

communicator - in as much as it

can show people that you are living

with a condition and you may not

want that.

Future solutions

Noticeably, pretty much all on-body

diabetes technology looks medical -

it's white, or maybe blue when on the

body. These colours are particularly

high-profile on darker skins; is that

preventing uptake in certain groups?

Should manufacturers look to offer

a wider range of skin tones for their

solutions? Maybe that will come. In

many ways we are at the start of this

era of devices and continuous data.

Much more people will end up with

access to diabetes tech, so we all

need to be ready to assist with that

which is why we ask why people are

not engaging with it. Conversely, it's

possible to assess why some people

take to it like a duck to water.

Sometimes, however, there can be

a lack of understanding by loved ones

- questions like, 'why are you high?'

This can be especially hard if these

people don't really understand how

diabetes works, that there are going

to be highs and lows, it goes with

the territory. Even with everything

tech has to offer, it's not possible

to flatten them all out. Which leads

me to explain the phrase 'follower

conflict', which is when HCPs and

partners, parents and carers are

given access to your readings by an

app or cloud-based service. Parents

in particular can tend to be highly

involved, and they have to be when

the children are little, it's a huge

responsibility. But parents often

find it hard to stop looking, they get

used to following their child, then

the child grows up and becomes

independent and may want them to

stop following their glucose levels."

Sometimes technology is rejected

by the user. We've looked at why this

might be, and put the reasons into

six categories:

1. Mistrust of technology, do you

want to trust your control to

artificial intelligence?

2. It is a visible sign of difference

i.e. you stand out because you're

wearing some diabetes kit.

3. The amount of information can

become overwhelming.

Caption here.

Index

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  2. Desang diabetes, magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall diabetes
  3. Sue Marshall, Desang, Desang diabetes kitbags, living with diabetes, type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabete
  4. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes news
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  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Air Liquide Healthcare UK Tandem t:slim insulin pump with Control IQ
  10. Page 0010
  11. BD, Becton Dickinson, injection technique, BD pen needles, BD and Me
  12. Page 0012
  13. Abbott Freestyle Libre 2, Flash Glucose Monitoring, FSL2
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Dexcom G6 CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  18. Medtronic MiniMed 780G System Automated for an easier way to stabilise glucose levels
  19. Medtronic MiniMed 780G System Automated for an easier way to stabilise glucose levels
  20. Page 0020
  21. Medtrum Touchcare Nano patch pump and CGM in harmony
  22. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes diet
  23. Page 0023
  24. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Dr Rose Stewart diabetes psychologist, wearing type 1 diabetes technology
  25. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Dr Rose Stewart diabetes psychologist, wearing type 1 diabetes technology
  26. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Dr Rose Stewart diabetes psychologist, wearing type 1 diabetes technology
  27. insulin pump, Dana RS system, artificial pancreas, Advanced Therapeutics UK, CamAPS FX, Dexcom G6
  28. Desang Diabetes Magazine, My Diabetes Kit, pro golfer Hannah McCook
  29. Desang Diabetes Magazine, My Diabetes Kit, pro golfer Hannah McCook
  30. Insulet Omnipod DASH insulin pump with insulin pods, podders, Omnipod DASH Personal Diabetes Manager
  31. Insulet Omnipod DASH insulin pump with insulin pods, podders, Omnipod DASH Personal Diabetes Manager
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. desang diabetes magazine, diabetes diet, diabetic diet, counting carbohydrates, food for diabetes
  35. Page 0035
  36. desang diabetes magazine, diabetes diet, diabetic diet, counting carbohydrates, food for diabetes
  37. Medtronic MiniMed 780G System Automated for an easier way to stabilise glucose levels
  38. desang diabetes magazine, diabetes diet, diabetic diet, counting carbohydrates, food for diabetes
  39. desang diabetes magazine, diabetes diet, diabetic diet, counting carbohydrates, food for diabetes
  40. desang diabetes magazine, diabetes diet, diabetic diet, counting carbohydrates, food for diabetes
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  42. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Making Carbs Count, carbohydrate counting for diabetes, lentils
  43. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Making Carbs Count, carbohydrate counting for diabetes, lentils
  44. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Making Carbs Count, carbohydrate counting for diabetes, lentils
  45. Desang diabetes kitbags, bag for diabetes kit
  46. Desang Diabetes Magazine, free diabetes magazine, living with diabetes

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