Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news

NEWS

GENE LINK TO TYPE 1

ANTENATAL SUPPORT NEEDED

Lack of support in

pregnancy adds to risks

Diabetes UK is calling for better prepregnancy

and antenatal support for

women with diabetes after an audit found

that gaps in these areas are putting

women at risk of serious complications.

The 2017/2018 National Pregnancy in

Diabetes (NPID)1 audit for England, Wales

and the Isle of Man found that, while the

vast majority of women with diabetes

went through pregnancy safely and

without serious complications, 170 out

of 8,255 pregnancies resulted in stillbirth

or neonatal death. The charity's analysis

of the audit has shown that - despite

progress to improve care in some areas -

women with diabetes are still experiencing

much poorer outcomes in pregnancy than

the general population.

Progress is ongoing to make

pregnancy safer for women with diabetes;

earlier this year it was announced that

continuous glucose monitors would be

made routinely available for all pregnant

women with Type 1 diabetes in England

by 2021. However, Diabetes UK says

that as well as clinicians keeping prepregnancy

support front of mind, further

interventions for women with Type 2

are also needed. The charity says that

healthcare professionals may not be

discussing pre-pregnancy planning

and urged clinicians to be aware of the

differences in care women with different

types of diabetes may need. More than

50% of pregnant women with Type 2

recorded in the audit were from non-white

backgrounds and over 60% lived in some

of the most deprived socio-economic

areas, so action is needed to support

women from these groups.

There are three ways to improve

pregnancy outcomes for women before

getting pregnant or as soon as women

are aware they are pregnant: ensuring

that HbA1c is at the recommended

safe levels; taking high-dose folic acid;

and reviewing medication (some Type 2

drugs - and some medications for blood

pressure and cholesterol - should not be

used during pregnancy).

www.diabetes.org.uk/pregnancy

People diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes

in early childhood are likely to have

more changes to key immune system

genes than people diagnosed later in life,

according to scientists at the University of

Oxford. The JDRF-funded study set out to

find if people who developed Type 1 early

had more of these genetic variants than

those diagnosed later on in life - or not

diagnosed at all.

Nine thousand participants with Type

1 diabetes formed three groups: those

diagnosed with type 1 before age seven,

diagnosed between age seven and 13,

and diagnosed over the age of 13. There

was also a control group who did not

have Type 1 diabetes. Important genetic

markers for Type 1 were found more

commonly in people diagnosed before

age seven, compared to those that were

diagnosed later in life and the control

group.

Many of the changes were to genes

involved in the function of specific

immune cells thought to be involved in

the autoimmune attack in Type 1. This

suggests that people may develop the

condition at an early age due to genetic

differences in the way their immune

system works. In contrast, environmental

factors could be more responsible for

Type 1 in older people.

Although further work is needed,

scientists may be able to use these

findings to develop drugs to target the

specific immune pathways which lead to

Type 1 in very young children.

www.diabetesjournals.com

Index

  1. Free online Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Dexcom CGM G6, continuous glucose monitoring
  3. Desang diabetes, magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall diabetes
  4. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump for Animas users
  5. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  6. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  7. Home test HbA1c, A1C Now Self-Check
  8. BD, Becton Dickinson, injection technique, BD pen needles
  9. BD, Becton Dickinson, injection technique, BD pen needles
  10. Abbott FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor
  11. Abbott FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor
  12. Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD), Diabetes Technology Network (DTN)
  13. Desang diabetes kitbags, Desang diabetes diaries
  14. Abbott FreeStyle Libre blood glucose sensor
  15. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods, podders
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Quality in Care (QiC) diabetes awards Sanofi, Dr Hilary Jones Type 1 diabetes
  19. Quality in Care (QiC) diabetes awards, Sanofi diabetes, Simon O'Neill Diabetes UK, Type 1 diabetes
  20. Quality in Care (QiC) diabetes awards, Sanofi diabetes, Type 1 diabetes
  21. Quality in Care (QiC) diabetes awards, Sanofi diabetes, Type 1 diabetes
  22. Quality in Care (QiC) diabetes awards, Sanofi diabetes, Type 1 diabetes
  23. Diabetes UK helpline
  24. Food news for people with diabetes, Waitrose
  25. Air Liquide Healthcare UK Tandem t:slim insulin pump with Basal IQ
  26. My Diabetes Kit Josh Malin Racing
  27. My Diabetes Kit Josh Malin racing
  28. My Diabetes Kit Josh Malin racing
  29. Insulin pump, Kaleido insulin pump, patch pump, ViCentra diabetes
  30. My Diabetes Kit Josh Malin racing
  31. Trividia Health UK True Metrix blood glucose monitoring (BGM)
  32. Desang Diabetes Magazine free to subscribe
  33. Desang Diabetes Magazine free to subscribe
  34. Chris Aldred, the Grumpy Pumper
  35. JDRF, INPUT, diabetes technology, access diabetes technology
  36. diabetes magazine, shaws of huddersfield chutneys
  37. diabetes magazine, shaws of huddersfield chutneys
  38. diabetes magazine, shaws of huddersfield chutneys
  39. Ascensia Contour Next One Diabetes blood test meters
  40. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Making Carbs Count
  41. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Making Carbs Count
  42. Desang Diabetes Magazine, Making Carbs Count, parma ham
  43. Insight insulin pump for Animas users
  44. Desang Diabetes Magazine free to subscribe

Related Issues

powered by PageTiger