Desang diabetes magazine, nothing beats a blood test, Helen Spriggs IDEAL Group, Bayer Esprit Glucom

LIVINGLIVING

keep your diabetes in the recommended

range then you aren't a priority. The effort

and sacrifice that it takes to get into

'range' then forbids some from getting

equipment that could make your life a

lot easier. It's totally unfair. You can be

penalised for being 'good', not rewarded.

The important things are choice and

information; it is not one size fits all. We all

need to have what fits best with our lives

to best look after our diabetes.

When I was growing up I knew of a

bee-hived singer, Mari Wilson, and the

American comedian and actress Elaine

Stritch who had diabetes. I recall not

understanding the value of monitoring

my blood. I vividly remember reading

a guidebook by the supplier Ames,

which featured Rupert the Bear and his

friends, which helped me to learn. I was

desperate to know about diabetes so

anything I could get my hands on helped.

I had another treasured book called

'Sugar Mouse' which helped me to know

I wasn't alone. There was no social media

back then to make contact with the wider

diabetes community.

Having diabetes threw up so many

questions and responsibilities. What would

happen if I ate at this time, or ate from

the red section of the traffic light book (a

food guide with the carb 'portions' in it),

what did that amount of insulin do, and

why was its important to inject it every

day at that specific time, why were those

numbers so significant to my DSN? Life

was very regimented according to my

early memories and I went for long periods

without monitoring at all, I remember

adopting a strange sort of logic, which

said that if I stopped taking insulin I would

become really ill quickly. So I kept taking the

insulin. There wasn't that same motivating

influence to check my blood glucose.

The bullying threat of 'complications'

hung over me like a dark cloud. But I

became a teenager who knew everything

and felt capable of ruling the world. So that

black cloud made me want to raise hell

now and worry about the consequences

later. Life became fun when I disowned my

diabetes. I only saw blood test results as

being for the benefit of others, something

I had to do for them, not me. University life

was great. I was away from the parents

who cared about my diabetes, in a crowd

who didn't even know I had it. I cast aside

my diabetes responsibilities and lived it

large. Maybe more than most, as I had

something to prove, It was a matter of

pride to party the hardest, longest and

wildest. Over the years I have met many

other people with diabetes and know my

story is not unique. Though we are all

unique in ourselves, as a group of people

sharing the same condition I think there is

a commonality in how we come to terms

with a lifelong diagnosis of T1D.

New beginnings

It couldn't go on like that. I ended up

being moved to a different diabetes team

and they just 'got it'. The DSN took an

interest in me -- the person, my life -- not

the 'diabetic.' She helped me to take

ownership of the diabetes; I had thought

belonged to the NHS, not me. She gave

me the tools to move on. We developed

a partnership of equals; it was give and

take. Plus, l think I was at an age when I

was ready to hear and adopt the advice I

was given. I 'grew up' a little more.

Suddenly blood glucose monitoring

meant something. The change taught

me to put value into taking some control

myself. Getting into a range of 4-8mmol/l

was easier to do than picking the winning

lottery numbers, so I got on with it.

I discovered a friend in DAFNE and

understood the complexities of balancing

diet, insulin, exercise and my lifestyle. I

started to see everything clearer, and I was

given the space to allow this new learning

to come together. I was encouraged and

supported unconditionally the team.

The meter that changed my life was

the Glucometer Esprit, it was round and

flat and had 10 strips on a disc, which continued over

meant I could conveniently check my

glucose on the go without fiddling with

pots and spilling strips. It also sucked

up my blood like a straw, which was

revolutionary, and it required very little of

it, and I got an answer within seconds.

It stored glucose readings and could all

be downloaded too. At the same time

I discovered this 'perfect meter' I also

started marathon running. I think this was

a demonstration of feeling that I was in in

the driving seat and proving to myself that

I could do the 'impossible'. To mark the

10th anniversary since my diagnosis I ran

the 1997 London Marathon.

For me, blood glucose monitoring

puts me in control. It gives me a clearer

understanding of the path I have trodden

and what may lie ahead. I can be as

prepared as I can. I know it keeps me on

track by giving me information that I now

understand how to use.

Not in isolation

Having said that, it's important to stress

no device is magic - it is not in isolation

from emotions, lifestyle, exercise, diet,

insulin types and patterns. In my early

days of blood glucose monitoring I was

taught the meter generated a 'good' or

'bad' number. Now I usually understand

Index

  1. Desang Diabetes Magazine, free diabetes magazine
  2. com CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  3. Desang Diabetes Magazine, free diabetes magazine
  4. Desang Diabetes Magazine, free diabetes magazine, diabetes news
  5. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes news, iLet insulin pump, Beta Bionics
  6. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes news, Urgo Start footcare
  7. Diabetes UK Careline
  8. About a diabetic, Alexander Edenwind
  9. Medtronic Minimed 670G hybrid closed loop insulin pump
  10. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes news, Teresa May
  11. Senseonics Eversense implantable CGM, Roche Diabetes Care, Accu-Chek
  12. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes food news
  13. Desang Diabetes Diaries, Desang Diabetes Kitbags, Diabetes UK
  14. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes food news
  15. HbA1c home test, A1C now, BHR Pharmaceuticals Ltd, home use A1C test, home use HbA1c test
  16. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes food news,
  17. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes food news,
  18. JDRF research Type One Diabetes beta cell tolerisation and beta cell regeneratwion
  19. JDRF research Type One Diabetes beta cell tolerisation and beta cell regeneratwion
  20. JDRF research Type One Diabetes beta cell tolerisation and beta cell regeneratwion
  21. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods, podders
  22. Desang Diabetes Magazine, free diabetes magazine
  23. Desang Diabetes Magazine, free diabetes magazine
  24. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes stories, nothing beats a blood test, Agamatrix Wavesense Jazz
  25. Desang diabetes magazine, diabetes stories, nothing beats a blood test, GlucoRx HCT, Nipro Diagnosit
  26. Page 0026
  27. Desang diabetes magazine, nothing beats a blood test, Helen Spriggs IDEAL Group, Bayer Esprit Glucom
  28. Desang diabetes magazine, nothing beats a blood test, Helen Spriggs IDEAL Group, Bayer Esprit Glucom
  29. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  30. Desang diabetes magazine, nothing beats a blood test, Helen Spriggs IDEAL Group, Bayer Esprit Glucom
  31. censia Contour Next One Diabetes blood test meters
  32. Desang diabetes kitbags
  33. Diabetes travellers checklist
  34. Keeping diabetes technology stuck in place, Funky Pumpers, Rock Tape
  35. Decorating diabetes kit, CGM stickers
  36. Diabetic food ulcers, Urgo Start Plus, would healing, diabetic wound healing, diabetes footcare,
  37. Diabetic food ulcers, Urgo Start Plus, would healing, diabetic wound healing, diabetes footcare,
  38. Diabetic food ulcers, Urgo Start Plus, would healing, diabetic wound healing, diabetes footcare,
  39. Diabetic food ulcers, Urgo Start Plus, would healing, diabetic wound healing, diabetes footcare,
  40. Making Carbs Count, Giancarlo Caldesi
  41. Page 0041
  42. Making Carbs Count, Giancarlo Caldesi, The Diabetes Weight-loss Cookbook, Type 2 weight loss, low ca
  43. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump for Animas users
  44. Desang diabetes magazine, free online diabetes magazine

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