sugar in food labels for diabetes diet, how to read nutrition labels

KITLIVING

continued over

fact that many people with diabetes seem

to use it to counter low blood sugars.

As most of us are aware, there's too

much sugar in sugary drinks, yet on the

other hand some of us rely on that sugar

to help us out when we've overdone either

the insulin or the exercise. In my opinion,

reducing sugar is (overall) good news, but

doing it by 'stealth' is not.

Personally, my bigger concern is that

sugar is being stealthily introduced, and

often being passed off as a health feature.

On-pack messaging tells us that items are

'innocent' and so on, but it seems to me

that the healthier the claim, the less likely

the truth of the statement. While not much

of this will be news to most people with

diabetes, I've found it to be an interesting

refresher as to how to handle diabetes in

a world that seems ever more confusing

when it comes to healthy food choices.

Sugar coated

I have to say that this feature has been

like opening a tin of (sugary) worms and

let's start with the first point, which is that

sugar is not a medical term, which is why

we test for blood glucose (although we

talk about 'blood sugar'). Simple sugars

digest quickly and raise blood sugar

levels rapidly. A low-sugar diet is now

being recommended for anyone, not just

people with diabetes, as well as a general

push towards having a low amount of

carbohydrates ('low-carbing') also being

recommended.

As with anything, 'low' is a question of

scale. How do you measure low or high

What is sugar?

Sugar is a sweet crystalline substance obtained from various plants, especially sugar

cane and sugar beet, consisting of sucrose. It is used as a sweetener in food and

drink and also to add texture, flavour and increase shelf life. Sugar is a carbohydrate

along with starch.

There are two main types of sugar, those that are contained in the cellular structure

of foods and drinks and naturally present in dairy products (these are intrinsic sugars

and you don't need to limit them), and those that are 'free' or 'added sugars' such

as the sugar added to food, and the sugars naturally present in honey, fruit juice and

syrups. These should be limited to no more than 5% of energy intake 3.

What are "free sugars"?

Free sugars are the sugars that the World Health Organization says need to be limited

to no more than 5% of total calories. These are the sugars added to foods, and

the sugars naturally present in honey, fruit juice and syrups. There are surprisingly

large amounts of free sugars in everyday foods and drinks, which are either added

by manufacturers (such as fructose, sucrose, glucose and corn sugar) or added at

home; for example, on cereal, hot drinks and whilst cooking.

A typical orange juice has more free sugars in it than a cola, but an orange eaten

whole has no free sugars because the sugars it has in it are tied to the fruit, fibre and

so on and are therefore not "free"

Naturally occurring sugar is the sugar found in whole, unprocessed foods, such

as milk, fruit, vegetables and some grains. The most common natural sugars are

fructose, which is found in fruit, and lactose, which is found in milk products.4

Added sugar is the sugar added to processed food and drinks when they are being

made, as well as sugar you may add to your food at home.3

No more than 5% of people's (from 2 years old and above) daily energy intake should

come from free sugars. This is a new recommendation announced by the World

Health Organization in March 2015.

Nutrition labels

Nutrition labels do not tell you how much free sugars there are in the product. You

can only tell if the food contains free sugars by checking the ingredients list. Or a

Sugarwise certified product, all of which are within the guidelines on free sugars. A

food containing lots of fruit or milk may not have any free sugars in it and therefore

be a healthier choice than one that contains lots of added free sugars in the form

of sugar, honey or juice. In this case the two products may contain the same total

amount of sugars.

What is classified as a sugar on nutrition labels?

The sugars figure in the nutrition label is the total amount of sugars in the food. It

includes sugars from fruit and milk, as well as the sugars that have been added.

www.sugarwise.org

Index

  1. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  3. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall
  4. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
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  6. Desang diabetes kitbags, Diabetes UK shop
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  9. Dexcom CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  10. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  11. Page 0011
  12. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news, Medical Detection Dogs
  13. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news, Ascensia Diabetes Challenge
  14. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  15. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  16. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes diet
  17. Desang diabetes kitbags Diabetes UK shop
  18. Fitlegs diabetes socks, Diabetes footcare, diabetic footcare
  19. Diabetes footcare, diabetic footcare, Fitlegs diabetes socks
  20. Diabetes footcare, diabetic footcare, Dr Foot
  21. Ascensia Contour Diabetes blood test meters
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  24. sugar in food labels for diabetes diet, how to read nutrition labels
  25. sugar in food labels for diabetes diet, how to read nutrition labels
  26. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  27. Neuropad diabetes footcare
  28. sugar in food labels for diabetes diet, how to read nutrition labels
  29. sugar in food labels for diabetes diet, how to read nutrition labels
  30. sugar in food labels for diabetes diet, how to read nutrition labels
  31. Diabetes socks, Fitlegs, diabetic footbare, socks for people with diabetes
  32. low carbs, low carbing, low carbohydrate diet, carb counting, Beverley Glock
  33. low carbs, low carbing, low carbohydrate diet, carb counting, Beverley Glock
  34. Making Carbs Count, carb counting, how to read a nutrition label
  35. Making Carbs Count, carb counting, how to read a nutrition label
  36. Making Carbs Count, carb counting, The Pioppi Diet Dr Malhotra
  37. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  38. Free diabetes magazine, Living with diabetes, the diabetic diet, carb counting

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