Desang diabetes magazine, digital detox, keep fit eat fit

KITLIVING

I

t may sound crazy, but it's

not too hard to believe when

you take a look around... how

many people can you see

looking down and clutching

their phone? You can pretty much do

anything and everything with it, so it's little

wonder we're all looking for the charger.

Need to pay a bill, send a card, do your

supermarket shopping or simply catch up

on the latest boxset? As easy as a few

little taps.

Ofcom's report, A Decade of Digital

Dependency, reveals that the younger

generation have bumped up the average

time spent online, with the regular 16-24

year old connected for a whopping 34.3

hours a week, but older people aren't

far behind. In fact, Britons are now so

addicted to smartphones that they now

check them every 12 minutes.

Of course, it's little surprise that

this 'addiction' is muddying the waters

between work and home life. Another

study* reveals that four in 10 British

workers often wake up in the middle of

the night to check on emails. The research

examined the stresses and strains of

modern working life, and found 44% are

often sending emails to colleagues and

clients in the midnight hours - with one in

10 admitting they'd fear for their job if they

didn't respond to emails promptly.

We don't switch off at 5pm on Friday,

either. The report also claims the average

Brit works another three hours over the

weekend, catching up on emails and

issues they didn't sort out during the

working week. And there's no escaping

from it even when jetting off on holiday,

with 37% admitting to checking in with

work even on annual leave. So, what's all

this doing to our health?

Apart from it affecting normal social

interactions, looking down at your phone

can impact your health. With the obvious

emotional effects that never switching off

from work can have on us, it can also

affect us physically. According to a study

in The Spine Journal, spine surgeons are continued over

BE SMART:

Take a break

It's no surprise

that some

people go on a

digital detox. But

how realistic is it

in this modern,

digital world,

especially when

we know they can be instrumental in

helping to manage diabetes. Perhaps a

good idea is to learn how to give it a rest

now and then, or to be more mindful

about how much time you spend on

your phone. Try some of these tips:

• Do not disturb. Set your phone to

only beep, vibrate or buzz during a time

that suits you. If you can't switch off

from being contacted by certain loved

ones, most phones let you set priority

contacts, so you don't have to worry

about not being reached. Make sure

you've set your sleeping times, too. Or,

better still, switch it off or don't take it to

bed in the first place.

• No to notify. Do you really need to

know when someone you vaguely know

checks in to the corner pub? No, you

don't! Switch off your social media

notifications and there'll be a lot less

unnecessary action coming from your

phone.

• Get real. Maybe you don't think you

spend that much time on your phone,

or you want to keep an eye on your use.

Download an app that will give you the

cold, hard facts. QualityTime for Android

and Moment for iOS record your phone

usage and then reveal how many hours

a day you look at a screen. That's not

all. You can also set alerts to notify you

if you've gone over your set limit.

seeing a rise in patients with neck and

upper back pain, most likely down to poor

posture during long periods of time spent

on smartphones. So, while it's wise to be

mindful of the negatives, the smartphone

can really come into its own when you're

living with a condition like diabetes. It can

really be of benefit and some studies even

suggest using a smartphone can help

overall blood sugars. Apps for forums,

tracking blood sugars, recording insulin

dosage etc, can all help you get smarter

about your diabetes. Here are some ways

your smartphone can be invaluable in

helping to manage your condition:

Keep track

From simply recording food and activity

levels, to setting goals for how many steps

you take, your phone can act as your

guardian angel when it comes to getting

you on track with a healthy lifestyle.

And, by connecting to other devices or

using certain apps, it can measure your

sleeping habits, heart rate and food/water

intake. Great if you're taking steps to get

fitter and healthier.

Step it up

If you're ramping up your healthy lifestyle,

there are plenty of apps or online

subscriptions to get focused on exercise

or healthy eating. But there's the danger

of information overload and not knowing

where to start. A new website, Keep Fit

Eat Fit, devises video-based exercise

routines for people of all levels - whether

you're a complete beginner or simply

can't get to the gym. All visitors to the

website can access an expanding library

of healthy cooking shows and recipes.

The site was created after the founders

realised that many people spend large

chunks of their life sitting down, and not

doing any exercise - or the exercise is so

infrequent or random due to busy lifestyles

that it has no real long-term benefit.

Index

  1. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  3. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall
  4. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  5. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  6. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  7. Dexcom CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  8. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  9. OneTouch Sports weekend, diabetes and exercise
  10. Ascensia art gallery World Diabetes day 2018 the family
  11. Ascensia Contour Next One Diabetes blood test meters
  12. Desang diabetes magazine Quality in Care diabetes awards
  13. Desang diabetes magazine Quality in Care diabetes awards
  14. Medtronic diabetes insulin pump, Medtronic Minimed 640G
  15. London Medical, London Diabetes Centre, private diabetes clinic
  16. Diabetes kit diabetes management equipment
  17. Medtrum diabetes technology, Medtrum insulin patch pump, insulin pump, CGM
  18. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes diet
  19. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes diet
  20. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  21. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  22. Desang diabetes magazine, digital detox, keep fit eat fit, angela coffey diabetes
  23. Desang diabetes magazine, digital detox, keep fit eat fit
  24. Desang diabetes magazine, digital detox, keep fit eat fit
  25. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods, podders
  26. Desang diabetes magazine, behaviour change, Our Path
  27. Desang diabetes magazine, behaviour change, Our Path
  28. Desang diabetes magazine, behaviour change, Our Path
  29. OurPath programme, Roche Diabetes Care
  30. Desang diabetes magazine, behaviour change, Our Path
  31. Medtronic Minimed 670G insulin pump
  32. Desang diabetes magazine, My Diabetes Kit, Paul Longley
  33. Desang diabetes magazine, My Diabetes Kit, Paul Longley
  34. Input Diabetes technology
  35. Desang diabetes kitbags
  36. Desang diabetes magazine, Abbott Freestyle Libre sensor
  37. Desang diabetes magazine, Abbott Freestyle Libre sensor
  38. Desang diabetes magazine, Abbott Freestyle Libre sensor
  39. Desang diabetes magazine, Abbott Freestyle Libre sensor
  40. Making Carbs Count the science of spice Dr Stuart Farrimond
  41. Making Carbs Count the science of spice Dr Stuart Farrimond
  42. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  43. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  44. Free diabetes magazine, living with diabetes, the diabetic diet, carb counting

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