Language matters in diabetes care

KITLIVING

But this campaign has not really just

about that, but about how people with

diabetes feel after they have been to an

appointment with their healthcare team,

and how improved language could lead

to improved outcomes in the long-term.

Type 1 diabetic and blogger Chris

Aldred (who uses Twitter under the name

#grumpy_pumper), has spoken about the

recent #languagematters campaign which

was reported by JDRF. He says, "I am

very happy with my current consultant.

I like that when I enter the appointment

room she asks how I am rather than

launching into a conversation about my

numbers - I feel she sees me as a person

before the diabetes. She asks me what I

want to talk about and I am able to lead

the conversation. I always leave feeling

positive and motivated."

Picking up on the fact that the

language used can often seem critical,

Aldred asks HCPS to consider, "When

someone is more open about what is

happening in their life, you can get a better

impression of what activities or events

might be impacting their blood glucose.

It's a win-win situation. Even when you

think that someone's management can be

improved, please stay positive. Criticism

and negativity rarely leaves a person

feeling motivated to change."

Another person with Type 1 diabetes

is Sarah Gatward who explains how

language can make a difference in a

clinical environment, remembering a

particularly useful visit to to her local GPs,

"Although I am now back under routine

hospital appointments, I tend to see

the team at my GP surgery either once

or twice a year for bloods, medication

review, flu vaccination etc. It is always

the same team, which is lovely, as you

feel they know you and you don't have to

start back at square one explaining your

history at each visit. As I sat down at one

particular appointment, the first question

the practice nurse asked me was "how

are you?" Diabetic clinic appointments

will always be different to appointments

you make to see an HCP when you are

unwell, as they know why you are there

and will often open the consultation by

pulling up your latest HbA1c result and

using that as a conversation starter. But

she asked me how I was!

"We moved onto bloods eventually

and she made some comment about

recognising that I always seem to have

everything well managed but she wanted

to make sure that I was okay…. as a

person… in my life…. It may not seem

a big deal but it was; not because I

particularly felt that I needed to talk about

any issues, but that she was asking about

the whole of me. The door was open for

me to talk about what I felt was important

- a subtle but very important difference.

It still makes me smile today when I think

about it."

However, not all of Gatward's

experiences with language have been

good ones. To read her full story, see

further reading below.

Right now my own favourite reference

is 'Type-oner'. Please be assured that no

offence is ever intended by the use of the

word diabetic, it's used as well as other

phrases in order to keep the way we do

refer to our condition open and varied

without causing too much confusion

about what can be a confusing condition.

Further reading:

Chris Aldred, also known as The Grumpy

Pumper, as reported by JDRF:

www.jdrf.org.uk/languagematters

Aldred is also talking about diabetes

complications, to read more visit

www.theplainjournal.com

To read more about Sarah Gatwood's

thoughts on language and other aspects

of diabetes care, see her blog at

www.sarah-gatward.co.uk

To download the Language

Matter Guide for HCPs, click

on the picture above.

Index

  1. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Medtronic Minimed 640G insulin pump
  3. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall
  4. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  5. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  6. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  7. Dexcom CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  8. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news, diabetes charities
  9. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news
  10. Page 0010
  11. Abbott Freestyle Libre blood glucose sensor
  12. Freestyle Libre blood glucose sensor
  13. Diabetes UK helpline
  14. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes diet
  15. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes diet
  16. Diabetes management equipment, Frio sharps bin
  17. Page 0017
  18. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  19. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  20. Professor John Pickup diabetes research, insulin pump research
  21. Professor John Pickup diabetes insulin pump research
  22. Professor John Pickup diabetes insulin pump research
  23. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods
  24. Professor John Pickup diabetes insulin pump research
  25. Ascensia Contour Next One Diabetes blood test meters
  26. Professor John Pickup diabetes insulin pump research
  27. Professor John Pickup diabetes insulin pump research
  28. Language matters in diabetes care
  29. Language matters in diabetes care
  30. Making Carbs Count cherries
  31. Jerte Picota cherries, Making Carbs Count
  32. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  33. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  34. Free diabetes magazine from Desang Diabetes Media

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