Nemaura Medical, Faz Chowdhury, sugarBEAT, BEATdiabetes, glucose sensor, glucose sensor for Type 2 d

LIVINGLIVING

idea of their control, nor do their GPs. It's

intermittent blood testing plus, if they're

lucky, a look at their HbA1c once or twice

a year. We still rely on that three-month

average, if they are even being given

an HbA1c test. CGM puts HbA1c into

perspective and is a far more useful tool."

Just beat it

It is more than likely that by using a sensor

many people with Type 2 diabetes can

learn to manage their diabetes control

better, motivated by seeing improved

results. Seeing such results will help them

to learn how foods - food choices - affect

their personal control. For example, they

might see a spike in their levels after

eating a baked potato and over time

consider an option with a lower glycaemic

index in order to get a curve, not a spike.

This could lead many people towards the

idea of a personal diet, a diet that is best

for them.

Additionally, the fact remains that

many of those people with diabetes

taking insulin - all Type 1s and some Type

2s - still do not have access to CGM. At

this stage they will be doing fingerpricks

which, while better than not doing

fingerpricks, only generates limited data

by comparison to CGM sensors.

A CGM aimed at people with Type

2 diabetes might seem incongruous

as so few Type 1s even have access to

CGM tech. Justification for sensor use is

nearly always down to improving control

by reducing the extremes - too high or

too low. With alarms available to give

warnings about an impending low will

allow users to intervene if they need to,

have a couple of jelly babies, a biscuit or

a juice and therefore avoid a hypo. Fear

of hypos is a major challenge to people

maintaining optimum control of their

diabetes, understandably.

Nemaura Medical developed the

sugarBEAT sensor and provided clinical

proof of its value, as a result gaining

CE approval in mid 2019 allowing the

company to market the sugarBEAT

sensor in the UK and Europe.

Just like Abbott's Freestyle Libre,

Dexcom G6 and Medtronic's sensors, this

sensor sits on top of the skin. However,

unlike those other sensors, sugarBEAT is

entirely non-invasive yet also measures

interstitial glucose, as the other sensors

do. As it is non-invasive with no

penetration of the skin, the glucose does

have to be pulled to the surface of the

skin in order that the sensor can to read

the levels. That meant that the sensor

had to be ultra-sensitive, able to measure

tiny volumes of glucose. The technology

required to do that is nanotechnology.

Super sensitive

Says Chowdhury, "One assumption

people have made is that we were

measuring the glucose in sweat, which

you could do, but perspiration is in itself

variable - we simply sweat differently

throughout our day. So that was never

going to be satisfactory enough. Our

sensor measures nano-moles of glucose

concentration from the blood. We needed

a way to have a consistent extraction rate

of glucose molecules, and that rate also

had to be constant. In order to achieve

this there is a skin preparation step which

enhances the permeability of the skin to

glucose; it is a simple way to disrupt the

top layer of skin in order to allow this to

happen."

This patch takes the form of a very thin

membrane which the user puts on the

skin and this is attached to the transmitter,

a small rectangular box that sits directly

on top of the skin. The patch delivers a

constant volume and rate of glucose

molecule from below the skin to the

sensor on the skin's surface. This glucose

then comes in contact with enzymes in

the sensor so that the glucose level can

be measured. The sensor takes just over

half an hour to warm up on average. After

prepping the skin with the patch, to put

a sensor on you simply apply the sensor

to the transmitter box which has adhesive

on it, and hold it against your skin and

press for 10 seconds. At the moment the

device is intended for use during waking

hours so that you can see how lifestyle

One of the great motivators for the

development team was to improve

quality of life for people with diabetes,

not just making it all about the

measurement, but making it about

ease of measurement and access to

the results in an easily understandable

way. - Faz Chowdhury

"

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Dexcom CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring
  6. Page 0006
  7. Medtronic Guardian Connect
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. BD, Becton Dickinson, injection technique, BD pen needles
  12. Page 0012
  13. Home test HbA1c, A1C Now Self-Check
  14. Page 0014
  15. Medtronic Minimed 670G hybrid closed loop insulin pump
  16. Page 0016
  17. Association of British Clinical Diabetologists, Diabetes Technology Network, Libre Flash education p
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. NHS UK coronovirus information
  23. Second Nature lifestyle behaviour change
  24. Carbs & Cals, Chris Cheyette, Yello Balolia, Making Carbs Count
  25. Carbs & Cals, Chris Cheyette, Yello Balolia, Making Carbs Count
  26. Carbs & Cals, Chris Cheyette, Yello Balolia, Making Carbs Count
  27. Diabetes UK helpline
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Nemaura Medical, Faz Chowdhury, sugarBEAT, BEATdiabetes, glucose sensor, glucose sensor for Type 2 d
  31. Nemaura Medical, Faz Chowdhury, sugarBEAT, BEATdiabetes, glucose sensor, glucose sensor for Type 2 d
  32. Nemaura Medical, Faz Chowdhury, sugarBEAT, BEATdiabetes, glucose sensor, glucose sensor for Type 2 d
  33. Nemaura Medical, Faz Chowdhury, sugarBEAT, BEATdiabetes, glucose sensor, glucose sensor for Type 2 d
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods, podders
  40. Page 0040

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