diabetes and coeliac disease, diabetes and gluten intolerance

KITLIVING

continued over

are just some of the main symptoms.

But, left untreated, people may well also

experience weight loss, anaemia and

osteoporosis. It also increases the risk

of developing small bowel cancer. While

there's no cure for coeliac disease, it's

treated by following a strict gluten-free

diet for life.

Is there a link with diabetes? If you

have Type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease is

more common because they're both autoimmune conditions. According

to Coeliac

UK, between 4-9% of people with Type

1 diabetes will also have coeliac disease.

There's no link with Type 2 diabetes,

though that doesn't mean you can't have

it or won't develop it, so it doesn't hurt to

be aware of the symptoms.

Symptoms

& diagnosis

There are lots of reasons for experiencing

the symptoms (see downloadable table,

overleaf), but if you're worried, make sure

you speak to your GP.

For most people with coeliac disease,

diagnosis can be a lengthy process and

there are currently an estimated 500,000

people with undiagnosed coeliac disease

in the UK. That's because symptoms can

be confused with stress, intolerances, or

simply put down to the ageing process.

Throw Type 1 into the mix and there's the

added problem that symptoms can be

missed altogether: ill-health can be put

down to diabetes. On top of this, according

to Coeliac UK, some people with Type 1

seem to have mild or no obvious symptoms

of coeliac disease, but the lining of their gut

will still be damaged when they eat gluten.

Repeated hypos can be a sign of coeliac

disease when you have Type 1 and, in

children, diabetes and growth problems

may indicate coeliac disease.

Most people with both conditions

are more likely to be diagnosed with

Type 1 first. But when coeliac disease is

diagnosed before Type 1, the symptoms

of diabetes tend to be more severe.

There's also an increased risk of having

other autoimmune diseases. If you

experience symptoms that could be

linked to eating gluten, it's vital to explore

possible causes. See your GP and talk

through your symptoms. If they suspect

coeliac disease, they'll order a blood test

to check for antibodies. From there, a

definite diagnosis can only be made from

a gut biopsy. It's important that, during

any of these stages, you continue to

eat gluten - you won't get an accurate

diagnosis if you've cut it out.

Gluten reduction

Should we all eat less gluten anyway?

Because it's in fashion, and some

people swear that going gluten free

makes them feel healthier and lose

weight, it can be tempting to jump onto

the bandwagon - even if you don't

have any negative symptoms to eating

gluten. But it's important to know you

could risk nutritional deficiencies if you

cut out food sources and don't replace

them with nutritious alternatives. If you're

experiencing gut problems, it's vital to

find the cause - there are so many other

reasons why you have these problems,

including other foods causing the issues.

Before drastically changing your diet, talk

to your GP and dietician. Whatever the

reasons, it seems that 'going gluten free'

is here to stay.

Index

  1. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Diabetes UK Helpline
  3. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information, Sue Marshall
  4. Dexcom buys Type Zero, JDRF UK, cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason
  5. Diabetes news, Now Pharmacy, Now Patient, Now Healthcare, Lee Dentith
  6. Diabetes news, Novo Nordisk buys Ziylo
  7. Medtronic Guardian Connect, Medtronic Enlite CGM
  8. diabetes food news, montezuma chocolate
  9. London Medical, London Diabetes Centre, private diabetes clinic
  10. MODY diabetes, Dr Andrew Hattersley, Professor Mark Strachan
  11. MODY diabetes, Dr Andrew Hattersley, Professor Mark Strachan
  12. MODY diabetes, Dr Andrew Hattersley, Professor Mark Strachan
  13. JDRF UK One Walk
  14. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  15. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system
  16. Diabetes kit, Natalie Balmain diabetes, Type 1 clothing
  17. Diabetes kit, Natalie Balmain diabetes, Type 1 clothing
  18. Diabetes kit, Natalie Balmain diabetes, Type 1 clothing
  19. Dexcom CGM, continuous glucose monitoring
  20. Medtrum Touchcare diabetes technology
  21. Medtrum Touchcare diabetes technology
  22. diabetes and coeliac disease, diabetes and gluten intolerance
  23. diabetes and coeliac disease, diabetes and gluten intolerance
  24. diabetes and coeliac disease, diabetes and gluten intolerance
  25. Ascensia Contour Next One Diabetes blood test meters
  26. OurPath programme, Roche Diabetes Care
  27. OurPath programme, Roche Diabetes Care
  28. OurPath programme, Roche Diabetes Care
  29. OurPath programme, Roche Diabetes Care
  30. Diabetes kit, Diabetic Supply, Omnipod insulin pump from Insulet
  31. Diabetes kit, Diabetic Supply, Omnipod insulin pump from Insulet
  32. Diabetes kit, Diabetic Supply, Omnipod insulin pump from Insulet
  33. Omnipod Insulet insulin pump with insulin pods
  34. Silla Bjerrum Robata Japanese grilling cookbook
  35. Silla Bjerrum Robata Japanese grilling cookbook
  36. Making Carbs Count pineapples
  37. Making Carbs Count pineapples
  38. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  39. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  40. Free diabetes magazine, living with diabetes, the diabetic diet, carb counting

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