Digital eye ID, Digital eye ID, Bausch+Lomb

LIVINGLIVING

homes and smart cars this new pattern

of digital interaction continues to rapidly

increase. As a result we all have some

form of digital ID, from how we project

ourselves in a digital sphere to how we

interact with it, which in turn can impact

our eye health and indeed our psychology

and dependency.

Take a BETH

Francesca Marchetti, independent ocular

specialist, comments, "We spend more

time plugged in than powered down and

that's both at home and at work. Up to

90% of our media interactions are screenbased. The simplest symptom of this is

tired eyes. Screens are very demanding

on your eyes - the written word is different

on screen than on paper. There's less

contrast so people's eyes have to work

harder, then there's glare to contend with

and screens, especially touch-screens,

are often pretty dirty. It's given rise to CVS

- computer vision syndrome with such

diagnoses as digital eye fatigue."

All is not lost though, there's one simple

solution, once you realise you need to do it,

just blink more. Says Marchetti, "We're just

not blinking enough. We should be blinking

at a rate of 18 times a minute, but when

we're using screens that rate drops down

to about six times. Blinking flushes the eye

and refreshes it. Less blinking means less

moisture and therefore dry eyes. It's why

dryness and discomfort gets worse as the

day goes on."

Switching off

Screen usage has been identified as the

main reason behind a trend for people to

stop using contact lenses and go back to

using specs, as dry eyes and lenses are a

bad combination. A good guide for a little

Eye health, high-tech and i-tech

CLEAR EYE ID

P

eople with diabetes

are well advised to

take greater care of

the health of their eyes.

Obviously good blood

glucose control is the first thing to try to

attain as diabetes can damage the fine

capilliaries in the back of the eye. But

diabetics are also prone to dry eyes too.

Many factors in modern life can affect

eyes making them dryer but new research

shows that increased use of screens -

from TVs to PCs to phones and tablets

mean that our eyes are under greater

strain than ever before.

Undeniably, digital devices are now

part of our everyday life. From watching

TV, to playing games, booking holidays,

chatting with our friends, taking selfies,

documenting our lives and monitoring

our health, our TVs, phones, tablets,

e-readers, laptops have become our

soulmates. With the growth of augmented

and virtual reality, smart watches, smart

Depending on how often you do this,

the information can become almost

continuous."

CGM is an increasingly interesting

area in diabetes care, though it is

considered costly. A 'third way' (not

finger-stick blood testing and not CGM)

is appearing. Leading the field at the

moment is Abbott's FreeStyle Libre. Says

Timol, "We are entering the market at a

much more affordable price than CGM.

The actual costings are not final yet. Users

will be likely to buy packs of patches at

a time, with each patch lasting 24 hours.

SugarBEAT is easy to wear, flexible and

needle-free, which is a plus-point against

invasive needle like sensors which have

to be inserted into the skin for weeks

at a time. SugarBEAT requires an initial

calibration and 'warms up' in only 30

minutes then it's good to go. If a patch

should fail, or somehow come off, you're

only paying for one daily use patch. With

other CGMs or flash glucose monitoring

you're out of pocket for something that

was due to be used 7 or 14 days. By

being daily disposable the skin irritation

caused by having a sensor stuck to your

skin for weeks at a time is also avoided. "

What's exciting about SugarBEAT,

beyond its non-invasive natures, is the

potentially affordable entry level and the

flexibility of how the sensor is worn as

well as the fact that it's UK made, it will

launch in the UK and is directed initially at

the diabetes market. We'll keep our eyes

on this one.

www.sugarbeat.com

www.nemauramedical.com

SugarBEAT continued

Index

  1. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  2. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  3. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes information
  4. Page 0004
  5. Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose system, Medical Detection Dogs, Limited Edition Accu-Chek Mobile pink
  6. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes news, Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes
  7. adAPT diabetes trial, Hid-In insulin pump belt
  8. Ascensia Contour Diabetes blood test meters
  9. Leatherice diabetes ID jewellery
  10. Desang diabetes magazine diabetes diet
  11. diabetic diet
  12. SugarBEAT
  13. Ascencia Contour Diabetes blood test meters
  14. Digital eye ID, Digital eye ID, Bausch+Lomb
  15. Digital eye ID, Bausch+Lomb
  16. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  17. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  18. Abbott Freestyle Libre, Flash Glucose Monitoring, blood testing without lancets
  19. Desang diabetes kitbags
  20. insulin pump wear AnnaPS, diabetesia Sofia Larsson-Stern
  21. insulin pump wear AnnaPS, diabetesia Sofia Larsson-Stern
  22. Making Carbs count: Counting carbs for the diabetic diet
  23. Making Carbs count: Counting carbs for the diabetic diet, the carb content of citrus fruit
  24. Making Carbs count: Counting carbs for the diabetic diet, the carb content of citrus fruit
  25. Accu-Chek Insight insulin pump
  26. Free diabetes magazine, Desang diabetes magazine

Related Issues